Is Medical Cannabis Bringing Dogfish?

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As hemp derivatives slowly become legal in more and more countries around the world, ever-more persistent claims are revealing the wonderful healing properties of cannabis compounds. While fragments of these can only be called scientifically proven, entrepreneurs engaged in medicinal hemp have found a huge market in which even any side effects do not cause a global scandal: veterinary medicine. But is the blues in the blues happy?
We do not necessarily need to change the dog’s consciousness to enjoy the beneficial effects of cannabis derivatives. Many active ingredients can be extracted from the plant, and while tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is responsible for the psychoactive function, marijuana swallows all the cure for healing the disease to another compound, the non-psychoactive-acting cannabidiol (CBD). Although the effects of the two compounds on human (and presumably animal) psychology are fundamentally different, the law regulates them in a single hat in most countries.

PRACTICAL, WHEN IT IS ILLEGAL, THERE IS ANY OF THE EXPOSURE EXCLUDED FROM INSIDE.
Of course, the fact that something is illegal (or illegal until recently) does not mean that it is useful. But it does not exclude it, as many livestock keepers are convinced that have been experimenting with their dogs and cats for decades. They are rarely drug therapists, so they do not necessarily have the knowledge or laboratory equipment needed to separate the various active ingredients of cannabis. That is, unfortunate (or lucky) animals get well from the consciousness-altering effect. In any case, these people (who will certainly be sober during the operation) have come to the conclusion from their behavior that cannabis derivatives have a cure for their favorites.

Because affluent dog keepers tend to buy their favorite ones that are heard here and there, it’s no wonder that the demand for veterinary cannabinoids is quite significant in North America. There are hardly any veterinary media that would not have dealt with the issue in the recent period, and the growing value of the market is indicated by the fact that a large proportion of such articles are sponsored by startups moving in the area.

The range of animal keepers interested in veterinary marijuana (so-called simplicity) coincides almost perfectly with those who prefer natural therapies, in the (false) belief that they are safe and effective by definition. The demand is so high that in the US states where their distribution has been legalized, the market for cannabis-derived animal products is growing by 57 percent per year.

MILLION IN THE MILLION OF 13 MILLIONS IN 2017 IN THE UNITED STATES, ADDIG 2022 TO 125 MILLION.

CBD is not cheap. The monthly dose of a large dog can easily get $ 3-400.

And why is this hype? Except for the cannabis fashion, interest is raised by claims that hemp derivatives cure a wide variety of diseases in humans and animals. They treat arthritis, prevent obesity, naturally prevent / cure cancer, have anti-inflammatory effects, and strengthen the heart. So they heal everything people and their dogs usually die.

But can this be proved? In a scientific sense, the safety and efficacy of a drug substance can only be demonstrated by clinical tests. So if they’re gonna have a lot of animals (here, we just have to confine themselves to the pets), they give them some of the drug, others will only replace it with a placebo and see if the treated group gets better. Since we didn’t find anything in the advertising of any product that would suggest that they had performed similar tests, we can assume that nothing has happened (or failed).

ANY NON-CERTIFICATE DAMAGES ARE LOCATED.
But they are full of attics. For example, Gary Richter, a Oakland veterinarian spoken by Guardian, claims that the CBD has “many benefits in medicine, I have seen [CBD-treated] animals that have had fewer seizures. What he can’t do, though unfortunately, is everyone expects him to solve everything. ”Richter also claims that, contrary to popular belief, THC is not toxic to dogs (this is not true, see below) and has a therapeutic effect, but only under medical supervision.

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